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The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

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The Hobbit:
The Battle of the Five Armies
TBOT5A Theatrical Poster
Directed by Peter Jackson
Produced by Peter Jackson
Fran Walsh
Carolynne Cunningham
Written by J.R.R. Tolkien
Fran Walsh
Philippa Boyens
Peter Jackson
Guillermo del Toro
Starring Sir Ian McKellen
Martin Freeman
Richard Armitage
Benedict Cumberbatch
Evangeline Lilly
Lee Pace
Luke Evans
Ken Stott
James Nesbitt
Orlando Bloom
Stephen Fry
Cate Blanchett
Mikael Persbrandt
Sylvester McCoy
Manu Bennett
John Tui
Sir Christopher Lee
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography Andrew Lesnie
Editing by Jabez Olssen
Distributed by New Line Cinema
(Warner Bros.)
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date(s) December 12, 2014 (UK), December 17, 2014 (US)
Running time 144 minutes
Language English
Preceded by The Desolation of Smaug
Followed by The Fellowship of the Ring (chronologically)
IMDb profile


The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies is a 2014 epic fantasy adventure film and the third and final installment of The Hobbit film trilogy. Like its predecessors The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, the film was produced and directed by Peter Jackson, who also directed The Lord of the Rings trilogy. The film is the sixth and final Middle-Earth film adaptation to be released and third chronologically.

Filming took place primarily in New Zealand. The film stars Martin Freeman as Bilbo, Ian McKellen as Gandalf the Grey, Benedict Cumberbatch as Smaug and the Necromancer, and Richard Armitage as Thorin Oakenshield.

The film begins with Smaug's attack on Lake-town and continue with Smaug's demise, The Attack on Dol Guldur, The Battle of the Five Armies, and the return journey.

On February 28, 2013, it was confirmed there is a new release date for The Hobbit: The Battle of The Five Armies. It has been announced via press, and now mirrors the release dates of Peter Jackson's Middle-earth films, The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. The film was released on December 12th  in the United Kingdom and other countries in Europe (e.g. Austria), and December 17, 2014 in the United States.[1]. The film was a major box office success, grossing over $955 million worldwide.

EtymologyEdit

The film's title The Battle of The Five Armies refers to the climactic battle by the same name between the Men of Lake-town, the Elves of Mirkwood, the Dwarves of the Iron Hills, the Orc armies from both Dol Guldur and Gundabad and the Eagles with the company of the Shape-shifter.  

SynopsisEdit

Bilbo and the Dwarves watch from the Lonely Mountain as the dragon Smaug destroys LaketownBard breaks out of prison and kills Smaug with the black arrow, whose falling body crushes the fleeing Master of Laketown. Bard, chosen as the new leader, and the people of Laketown seek refuge in the ruins of DaleTauriel travels to investigate Mount Gundabad with Legolas. Upon arriving at Erebor, Fili, Kili, Bofur and Oin are informed by Bilbo that Thorin has been inflicted with Smaug's "dragon sickness" as he searched for the Arkenstone. It is revealed that Bilbo actually stole the Arkenstone from Smaug but knows it should be hidden from Thorin, who orders the entrance of the Lonely Mountain be sealed off.

Meanwhile, having become a prisoner in Dol Guldur, Gandalf is saved by Galadriel. Galadriel carries an unconscious Gandalf into a more open area while being taunted by The Necromancer. Elrond, Saruman, and Radagast arrive and rescue the Grey Wizard. Gandalf is saved by Galadriel and given to Radagast while Elrond and Saruman hold off the Nazgûl. Sauron appears to them with the Nine at his side. Using the power of Nenya and her Phial, Galadriel takes on the Dark Lord and the Ringwraiths, banishing them out of the fortress. Galadriel falls back fainting as Elrond supports her, realizing she has used her full strength in order to cast him away. Though Elrond believes they must warn the Free People of the enemy's return and set a watch upon the boundaries of Mordor, Saruman tells him to take Galadriel to safety while he deals with Sauron. Radagast provides Gandalf a horse and his staff before riding to Dale. At that time, Azog approaches the Lonely Mountain with his vast Orc army while learning from Bolg that an elf army under Thranduil is also approaching. Azog tells Bolg to head to Gundabad and ready their other army. Following Bolg to the fortress of Gundabad, Legolas and Tauriel see Bolg with another army of Orcs and hundreds of war-bred bats. They decide to return to Laketown to warn the others.

When Thranduil's army arrives in Dale, he forges an allegiance with Bard to claim a necklace of white gems from Thorin's treasure. Though Bard attempts to reason with Thorin to avoid further bloodshed, the stubborn dwarf refuses to listen, to his company's dismay. As they prepare for the battle, Thorin gives Bilbo a mithril vest. Thorin begins to talk like Smaug, telling Bilbo that he will never share the treasure with Bard and Thranduil, not wanting to part with a single coin. After Gandalf arrives at Dale, Bilbo sneaks out of the Lonely Mountain to hand the Arkenstone over to Thranduil and Bard. Inside the camp, Thranduil reminds Gandalf that he is the one who started all this and he will finish it.

The next day, the elf army and the armed people of Laketown gather at the entrance of the Lonely Mountain. Thranduil and Bard ride at the front, where Thorin threatens to kill them if they get any closer. Bard unveils the Arkenstone at the gates of Erebor and Thorin learns of Bilbo's actions and almost kills the Hobbit. Luckily, Gandalf approaches at the front with Bard and Thranduil, telling Thorin that Bilbo is his to keep. The other dwarves hold off their leader so Bilbo can escape down the wall to Gandalf. Then, a dwarf company under Dáin II Ironfoot arrives and is about to attack the elves on Thorin's call, but Azog sends one branch of his army to attack Dáin's force. While Thranduil assists Dáin's army, Azog sends the rest of his forces to attack Dale with Bilbo, Gandalf, Bard, and the other elves coming to its defense. Gandalf, Thranduil, Bard, and Dain do the best they can to hold off the Orc armies as more and more come, killing more Dwarves, men, and elves. Meanwhile, Alfrid takes a pile of treasure and escapes the battlefield, with Bard permitting him to do so.

Inside the Lonely Mountain, Thorin eventually overcomes his madness after a lengthy hallucination. Thorin and company burst out of the Mountain and join the battle, much to Dáin's delight. While the others aid what remains of Dáin's forces, Thorin rides towards Ravenhill with Dwalin, Fili, and Kili to kill Azog. At the same time, after being banished by Thranduil despite her and Legolas warning him of Bolg's army, Legolas and Tauriel set off for Ravenhill with Bilbo following to warn the Dwarves of the second Orc army. Thorin tells Fili and Kili to scout the towers as Bilbo came and warned them. But he is too late. Azog captures Fili and stabs him in the back before throwing him off a tower. While Thorin fights Azog to avenge Fili, Kili dies protecting Tauriel from Bolg. After Legolas kills Bolg, the Great Eagles arrive, led by Radagast and Beorn, to assist in the battle, quickly decimating the orc army. When Bilbo regains consciousness, he finds that Thorin has killed Azog but was mortally wounded in the process and dies soon after making his peace with the hobbit. Sometime after, a disillusioned Legolas leaves his father to meet with one of the Dúnedain, a man who goes by the name of Strider. Thranduil, after seeing Tauriel kiss Kili's dead body, finally accepts Tauriel's love for Kili and agrees with her plan to bury the dwarf. Bilbo bids farewell to the surviving members of Thorin's company, telling them they are welcome to join him for tea whenever they are in the Shire, to which he returns with Gandalf. As they part on the outskirts of the Shire, Gandalf reveals that he knows of the Ring that Bilbo found in the Goblin tunnels (though unaware that it was the One Ring) before they part ways on good terms. Bilbo's story ends when he returns to Bag End and finds the Sackville-Bagginses are auctioning off his belongings and are about to sell his house. The scene transitions to Bilbo on the day of his 111th birthday when he receives a visit from Gandalf, ending where the The Fellowship of the Ring begins.

CastEdit

Significant CastEdit

UncreditedEdit

RumoredEdit

Deviations from the bookEdit

Main article: Tolkien vs. Jackson: Differences Between Story and Screenplay

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies covers the final seven chapters of The Hobbit with a few elements added from the Appendices from The Lord of the Rings. While it generally follows the story, a number of liberties were still taken:

  • In the books, orcs aren't mentioned at all. There is a single mention of "goblins, hobgoblins, and rest of the worst description", where the hobgoblins are probably orcs and are probably larger than goblins. But the opposing army is a goblin army, not an orc or hobgoblin is mentioned to be part of it, let alone leading it. Tolkien has been ambiguous if orcs and goblins are the same. In the movie trilogy, goblins were previously encountered in the misty mountain and those were distinct from the orcs. In the books there are only different groups of goblins.
  • The character of Alfrid does not exist in the book.
  • There is no thrush telling Bard of Smaug's weak point while trying to kill him (having been replaced by the legend that Girion had loosened a scale on the Dragon's breast in the previous film). Also, his son, Bain, helps Bard by getting him the last Black Arrow.
  • The Master of Lake-town dies by Smaug falling on his boat while trying to escape Lake-town instead of starvation in the desert.
  • The storyline concerning Legolas and Tauriel (who is an original character) both riding to Gundabad where they discover a second Orc army, led by Bolg, is headed to Erebor along with thousands of bats is invented for the film, as is the element of Legolas' mother-Thranduil's wife-having been tortured to death there.
  • As all of the members of Thorin and Company reach the Lonely Mountain in the first place, in the books Óin, Bofur, Fíli and Kíli are not coming to the Mountain later alone.
  • Galadriel does not free Gandalf in Dol Guldur in the books, as he didn't get captured.
  • In the books, there is no hint that the Nazgûl are present at the Attack on Dol Guldur launched by the White Council. Furthermore, in The Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf points out at the Council of Elrond that the victory was thanks to the devices of Saruman, while in the movie it is chiefly Galadriel who expells Sauron with her phial.
  • Gandalf says that Sauron wants to conquer the Lonely Mountain because of its "strategic position", as part of a plan to resurrect the ancient kingdom of Angmar. In the books, Gandalf indeed fears that Sauron could ally with the Dragon, but the Dark Lord isn't concerned with the Battle of Five Armies or Erebor.
  • In the book Thorin went into battle in shining armor 'gleaming like gold in a dying fire', while in the movies he is in his chain mail coat.
  • Azog isn't present in the books, as he is already dead during the events of The Hobbit.
  • The Orcs have a watchtower with a construction giving signals.
  • The huge animals called "Were-worms," which burrow tunnels to Erebor through which the Orc armies travel, never appear in that capacity in any of Tolkien's writings.
  • Since Bilbo is unconscious for most of the battle in the book, most things in the film's battle are invented, such the presence of Trolls, war machinery, and battle rams.
  • At one point in the battle, the women of Lake-town decide to take up arms and fight alongside the men.
  • Instead of dying while defending their mortally wounded uncle, Fíli and Kíli are slain by Azog and Bolg, respectively, at Ravenhill before Thorin ever receives such injury.
  • In the book Beorn doesn't come to the battle riding an eagle and Radagast doesn't appear at the battle, nore anywhere else in the book other than by mention.
  • In the movie, Legolas kills Bolg, while in the book it is Beorn.
  • Thorin dies on Ravenhill without Beorn ever taking him to safety.
  • In the book, Orcrist is put in Thorin's tomb by Thranduil. In the film, he receives it from Legolas throwing it at an Orc meaning to kill Thorin.
  • When Legolas informs his father he will not be returning to Mirkwood, Thranduil urges him to find a Man known as "Strider". Thranduil had little to nothing to do with the Rangers of the North in the books, and, during the events of The Hobbit, Aragorn is a mere 10 years old (he was said to be 87 in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers). However, in the film The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, there is no year gap between Frodo inheriting the ring and setting out on his journey. Also the name Strider was given by the people of Bree, many years later. Nowhere else was this name known, not even Bilbo Baggins knew this name, while he did know Aragorn. At the time 'The Hobbit' takes place Aragorn was in Rivendell, where he was known as 'Estel', meaning Hope or Trust in Sindarin
  • Bilbo gave Thranduil a necklace of silver and gems in the book, which was never shown, nor the returning of the arkenstone by Bard.

ReceptionEdit

The Battle of the Five Armies world premiere was on December 1st 2014. The event took place in Leicester square in London, Many of the cast were there and the film event went very well. The film was received very well and many critics praised the film's visuals, acting, and action sequences. However, some expressed criticism on the short length of the film. Rotten tomatoes rated it 61%.[3]

VideosEdit

TrailersEdit

ExtrasEdit

InterviewsEdit

GalleryEdit

PostersEdit

BannersEdit

Promotional ImagesEdit

Character PostersEdit

ScreenshotsEdit

SoundtrackEdit

Regular AlbumEdit

THTBOT5AOSTCover

Original Soundtrack Cover

Disc 1

  1. Fire and Water
  2. Shores of the Long Lake
  3. Beyond Sorrow and Grief
  4. Guardians of the Three
  5. The Ruins of Dale
  6. The Gathering of the Clouds
  7. Mithril
  8. Bred for War
  9. A Thief in the Night
  10. The Clouds Burst
  11. Battle for the Mountain

Disc 2

  1. The Darkest Hour
  2. Sons of Durin
  3. The Fallen
  4. Ravenhill
  5. To the Death
  6. Courage and Wisdom
  7. The Return Journey
  8. There and Back Again
  9. The Last Goodbye performed by Billy Boyd
  10. Ironfoot

Special Edition AlbumEdit

THBOFA-Special-Edition-Cover-Art

Special Edition Cover

Disc 1

  1. Fire and Water
  2. Shores of the Long Lake
  3. Beyond Sorrow and Grief
  4. Guardians of the Three
  5. The Ruins of Dale
  6. The Gathering of the Clouds
  7. Mithril
  8. Bred for War
  9. A Thief in the Night
  10. The Clouds Burst
  11. Battle for the Mountain

Disc 2

  1. The Darkest Hour
  2. Sons of Durin
  3. The Fallen
  4. Ravenhill
  5. To the Death
  6. Courage and Wisdom
  7. The Return Journey
  8. There and Back Again
  9. The Last Goodbye performed by Billy Boyd
  10. Ironfoot
  11. Dragon-Sickness (Bonus Track)
  12. Thrain (Bonus Track)

TriviaEdit

  • This film is the last film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings and related works, as the Tolkien Estate has forbidden any more films from being made for the time being.
  • In Sir Christopher Lee's most recent Christmas Video, he has speculated upon the movie and that Saruman The White will have a lot more screen time in this movie.
  • In this film, Galadriel is seen fighting Sauron.
  • In an interview with Boyens, there is a reason why the dwarves were split, and she said Bofur needs to see the attack on Lake town.
  • In an interview with Richard Armitage, he said the third might be a shorter film and the Battle of the Five Armies cost a lot of blood and tears.
  • The Witch King, as well as the other members of the Nazgûl are featured in this film. They are featured fighting the White Council in Dol Guldur.
  • Beorn appears very briefly and most of his role will be featured in the Extended Edition.
  • Elijah Wood did not return as Frodo Baggins.[4]
  • Bolg's earlier concept for the film makes a brief appearance as a separate character.
  • Aragorn II is mentioned by King Thranduil, who is referred as "Strider" and the son of Arathorn. In the books, he is still supposed to be a child and not yet bear the name of "Strider". However, given the apparent lack of a time skip in the film of The Fellowship of the Ring (movie), how Bilbo was stated to carry the ring for sixty years, and how Aragorn stated that he was 87 in the Extended Edition of The Two Towers (movie), it's possible that Aragorn is supposed to be 27 at this point by the film adaptation's timeline.
  • The ending scene is the same scene as the scene in The Fellowship of the Ring where Bilbo greets Gandalf at the door in Bag End, except it's viewed from inside.



ReferencesEdit

  1. Mrcere (February 28, 2013). Third 'Hobbit' movie release moved from July to December 2014. TheOneRing.net. Retrieved on March 2, 2013.
  2. Twitter.
  3. Rotten Tomatoes rating. Rottentomatoes.com. Retrieved December 22, 2014
  4. Confirmed: Elijah Wood will not return as Frodo Baggins

External linkEdit

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