FANDOM



The Petty-dwarves (named in Sindarin Noegyth Nibin or Nibin-Noeg, part of an older and longer word Bar-en-Nibin-noeg) were a diminutive race of dwarves that lived in the Beleriand in Middle-earth during the First Age. They differed from normal dwarves in various ways: they were smaller, far more unsociable, and they freely gave away their names; other dwarves kept their Khuzdul names and language a secret.

HistoryEdit

388px-400px-Mim Khim Ibun

Mim, Khim and Ibun - Petty-dwarves

The Petty-dwarves were dwarves of several houses, which had been exiled for reasons unknown in very ancient times during the Peace of Arda. They were the first to cross the Blue Mountains in the First Age, and established strongholds in Beleriand before the building of Nogrod and Belegost in the Blue Mountains, and before the Elves arrived. They delved the very ancient settlements of Nulukkizdin (Nargothrond) and Amon Rûdh but they dwindled before the Ñoldor returned to Middle-earth.

The Sindar, not yet acquainted with dwarves, thought the Petty-dwarves were animals, and hunted them. Not until the dwarves of the Blue Mountains established contact with the Sindar did the latter realize what the Petty-dwarves were. Afterwards they were mostly left alone, but not before the Petty-dwarves came to hate all elves with a passion.

By the time of the War of the Jewels, after the Return of the Ñoldor, the Petty-dwarves had nearly died out. By the fifth Century of the First Age, the last remnant of their people were Mîm and his two sons, who lived at Amon Rûdh. Túrin and his men shot at the dwarves, mistaking them for animals or Orcs. Mim survived, but an arrow had killed one of his sons, Khîm. Mîm's other son had been killed by orcs, leaving Mîm the last of his kind. Mîm was killed by Húrin after the latter's release from Angband, and the Petty-dwarves were no more.[citation needed]

Origin in Tolkien's writingsEdit

The Petty-dwarves were created from remnant ideas based on the Nauglath in Tolkien's earliest writings in the The Book of Lost Tales. They were more or less created to explain the difference between the dwarves later writings such as The Hobbit in comparison to the Wicked dwarves from his earlier stories which he hadn't yet completely abandoned. However, some of the ideas of the Nauglath were reincorporated into the Naugrim (Dwarves) by J.R.R. Tolkien or his son in the published Silmarillion and separate from the Petty-dwarves (such as the history of Belegost and Nogrod, and the Sack of Doriath events).

Niwennog was their first ascribed name (preceding the change to Nibin-noeg), as told of in the index of The War of the Jewels.[citation needed]

Translations around the worldEdit

Foreign Language Translated name
Afrikaans Klein dwerge
Albanian I vogël Xhuxha të vegjël
Amharic ትናንሽ ኖዎች
Arabic الأقزام الصغيرة
Armenian Փոքր Թզուկները
Azerbaijani Kiçik cüceler
Belarusian Cyrillic маленькія гномы
Bosnian Mali patulji
Bulgarian Cyrillic Малки Джуджета
Cambodian មនុស្សតឿតូចៗ
Catalan Petit nans
Croatian Sitni patuljci
Czech Drobní trpaslíci
Danish Smålig Dværge
Dutch Nietige Dwergen
Esperanto Malgranda nanoj
Estonian Väikesed päkapikud
Finnish Vähäkääpiöt
French Petits-Nains
Galician Ananos Pequena
Georgian მცირე ჯუჯები
German Kleinzwerge
Greek Μικρό Νάνοι
Hebrew קטן הגמדים
Hindi छोटे बौने
Hungarian Pici-törpök
Icelandic Lítil Dvergar
Indonesian Kecil Kurcaci
Irish Gaelic Abhaic Beaga
Italian Nanerottoli
Japanese 小さい矮星
Kannada ಸಣ್ಣ ಕುಬ್ಜಗಳು
Korean 작은 난쟁이
Latin Nani Parvus
Latvian Nelielu rūķis
Lithuanian Mažas Nykštukai
Luxembourgish Klengzwake
Macedonian Cyrillic Мали Џуџињата
Maltese Nani żgħar
Mongolian Cyrillic Жижиг одой
Norwegian Smålig Dverger
Persian کوچک دورف‌ها
Polish Krasnoludy Poślednie
Portuguese Anões Pequenos
Punjabi ਛੋਟੇ ਡੌਵਰਜ਼
Romanian Mici Piticii
Russian Малые гномы
Scottish Gaelic Troichean Beaga
Serbian Мали патуљци (Cyrillic) Mali patuljci (Latin)
Slovak Malí trpaslíci
Slovenian Majhni škrati
Spanish Enanos Mezquinos
Tajik Cyrillic Котибот майда
Tamil சிறிய குள்ளர்கள்
Telugu చిన్న మరుగుజ్జులు
Thai คนแคระขนาดเล็ก
Turkish Pitya-naukor
Ukrainian Cyrillic Малі гноми
Urdu چھوٹے گنوماس
Vietnamese Nhỏ người lùn ?
Welsh Corrachod Bach
Yiddish קליין דוואַרפס